HOW OUR SENSES AND EMOTION AFFECT OUR BUYING BEHAVIOUR

HOW OUR SENSES AND EMOTION AFFECT OUR BUYING BEHAVIOUR

Think of the last time you walked into a retail store; can you recall your emotions and feelings? Chances are that one of them would have been hope – but how long did that feeling last? Because in general, we have high expectations and a low stress threshold when we’re on a purchasing mission. Our consumer needs must be met as seamlessly as possible, whilst at the same time we seek to enjoy the purchasing experience. Consider for a moment the regular grocery shop; it’s what retailers refer to as a ‘distress’ or ‘convenience’ shop – for the most part, made as easy and convenient for us as possible. However, whilst the navigation of the store might go relatively smoothly, the end of that particular journey is almost guaranteed to frustrate – arrival at the checkouts; we spend time evaluating the queues, skilfully selecting the one which is obviously quickest and almost invariably pick the wrong one. Typical. Result? We leave the store feeling frustrated and a little irritable. Head vs Heart Most consumers today are in search of an immersive experience. Along with buying products and services, we expect to buy enjoyable, memorable and wonderful experiences that stir our emotions by immersing our senses – allowing us to transform a tedious, ordinary in-store experience into a pleasurable, emotional journey. When it comes to purchasing; from food to clothes to technology, our emotions and senses are continuously stimulated. But what drives our purchase decision when we encounter sensory overload? We employ our logic, right? Wrong. According to professor Antonio Damasio’s latest findings in neuroscience, decision-making isn’t logical, it’s emotional....
LACOSTE’S SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY STRATEGY

LACOSTE’S SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY STRATEGY

Known for his crocodile logo and iconic polo designs, Lacoste has created an important social responsibility project during Paris Fashion Week, in collaboration with the l’Union internationale pour la Conservation de la nature (IUCN) (International Union for Conservation of Nature) foundation. The Save Our Species project saw the brand change its iconic crocodile logo with stamps of 10 threatened species, such as the Sumatra tiger and the Kakapo parrot. The number of polos produced with each of the new patches corresponds to the number of individuals known to remain in the wild. For example, there are only 30 shirts with the critically endangered Vaquita and 50 with the Northern Lepilemur. Lacoste and agency BETC worked closely with IUCN’s experts to define and select ten threatened species. A total of 1,775 polo shirts launched during the brand’s runway show at Paris Fashion Week, with half of the profits going directly to the IUCN to fund concrete nature protection actions and the other half – invested in communication to give visibility to the cause and the Save Our Species program. Shoppers who want to contribute to the cause but have missed the opportunity to snatch a polo can donate to IUCN directly. — This post was written by Brandcared. Based in New York, Paris and Istanbul, Brandcared is the first and only fashion management company in Turkey that manages strategical, conceptual and business operations under one roof with global and local business partners. ​Brandcared proposes fashion business solutions, bespoke trainings, win-win projects for fashion companies, fashion designers and also for other sectors that want to know fashion industry closely. Have a...
APPAREL FUTURES: FIVE LEARNINGS FROM FIVE FUTURISTS

APPAREL FUTURES: FIVE LEARNINGS FROM FIVE FUTURISTS

If it feels like a year since the last BDYHAX conference, that’s because it has been. As Austin is preparing for another three-day celebration of human enhancement, transhumanism, biohacking, we look back at last year’s Apparel Futures panel and extrapolate some key learnings that are still very much relevant today. The “Apparel Futures” panel brought together influencers from media, fashion design, and academia: Valerie Vacante Founder of Collabsco and Contributor to Futur404, Kristina Dimitrova (Founder and Editor in Chief of INTERLACED), Bushra Burge (Founder of Bushra Burge Studio),  Birce Ozkan (Interaction Designer, Luminous) and  Kristin Neidlinger (Founder of SENSOREE) shared their experiences and learnings when it comes to designing the future of fashion. Purpose The fashion tech industry is at a crossroad. In the past, designers and tinkerers merged technology and fashion with the tact of Dr. Frankenstein. This resulted in clothing that was neither useful, nor fashionable. The cure, according to the panelists, is to create with purpose. A great example of this is Project Jacquard, a Google/Levi collaboration that is trying to “weave touch and gesture interactivity into any textile.” The Levi’s Commuter Trucker Jacket uses this technology to make biking safer. With simple gestures or touch, the cyclist can interact with his or her phone to answer calls or access navigation information. This is the type of integration the panelists emphasised when talking about blending tech and fashion with a purpose. Collaboration When designers and engineers don’t collaborate from the inception of a project, you get gadgets like Google Glass. It clearly looks like a technology-first, design-second product. With many brands feeling the sting as a...