FLORA MIRANDA USES AI, DATA AND GENERATIVE DESIGN TO TURN YOUR FACEBOOK HISTORY INTO PERSONALISED GARMENTS

FLORA MIRANDA USES AI, DATA AND GENERATIVE DESIGN TO TURN YOUR FACEBOOK HISTORY INTO PERSONALISED GARMENTS

Antwerp-based fashion designer Flora Miranda focuses her work on the human being, one’s body, senses and perception, performing in an actual or virtual reality. She embraces the experiment as a vehicle towards broadening established standards of craftsmanship and design, challenging the obsolete idea of high couture. We came across Miranda’s innovative work during the third edition of Fashion Talks, which brings disruptors, emerging designers and established fashion and creative businesses to celebrate the industry and ponder the future. Miranda was exhibiting her latest project – IT Pieces – a tool that collects data about a user’s online behaviour to design a unique item of clothing, especially with him or her in mind. People sign in with the app, which gathers information about their online behaviour, including Google searches, Facebook friends, places visited or music downloaded. It then personalises a t-shirt with a number of lyrics by Finnish musician Jaakko Eino Kalevi, which reflect the analysed information about the user. We sat down with the designer to talk more about IT Pieces, her creative process and breaking fashion conventions. What is your background? How did you get into fashion and what sparked your interest in technology? My identity is anchored in a world of art, my father and other members of my family in Austria are musicians and visual artists. To me, art was the most natural environment to move in, the language I grew up with. The other side of my family is from a more pragmatic origin, owning and running a big farm is their way of living. I believe this is where my attraction to the business...
EVENT REPORT | THE DNA OF DISRUPTIVE BRANDS

EVENT REPORT | THE DNA OF DISRUPTIVE BRANDS

The breakfast session, hosted by brand experience agency Rufus Leonard, featured a panel of disruptive brands including The House of St Barnabas, Birchbox, and Kaido. It opened with a presentation from Charlotte Beckett, senior strategist at Rufus Leonard, on “The DNA of Disruption”, the four main components being “The Individual”, “The Team”, “The Organisation”, and “The Consumer”. First, though, some context. As a trusted adviser to some of the UK’s most established brands, Rufus Leonard is fascinated in disruption and understanding the ways in which learning from the disruptors can help these brands avoid being disrupted while disrupting categories themselves. A year ago, the agency set out in its attempt to measure brand experience with the first Brand Experience Index, which enables brands to calculate their total impact on customers across touchpoints compared to their competitors. Rufus Leonard is launching the second wave in the coming weeks, which will combine the agency’s interest in disruptors with that of brand experience. Rufus Leonard started with a hypothesis in mind – that the disruptors in each sector would score well on practical, active measures such as “Do” and “Purpose” but were surprised that, in fact, brands including Airbnb, Netflix, and Uber, posted higher Brand Experience Index scores in the three more emotional facets: “Feel”, “Sense”, and “Connect”. This highlights that for a brand or a business to truly disrupt a market it can’t just engage with people in rational terms, it has to engage on an emotional level as well – winning people’s hearts and minds. The DNA of a Disruptive Organisation  Charlotte Beckett, senior strategist, Rufus Leonard In terms of providing a definition,...
CFE ANNOUNCES THE LATEST INTAKE OF FASHIONTECH PIONEERS

CFE ANNOUNCES THE LATEST INTAKE OF FASHIONTECH PIONEERS

London College of Fashion’s Centre for Fashion Enterprise (CFE) has announce six new businesses to join its FashTech Pioneer Programme. Taking full advantage of fashion and technology innovation, non-woven textiles company DOPPELHAUS, jewellery rental service GLITZBOX, high-performance childrenswear brand PETIT PLI, wardrobe management platform SAVE YOUR WARDROBE, location-based retail app SHOPEST, and AI-powered visual search engine TEGGNET, have set out to lead the future of the fashion industry. The businesses were selected on the basis of bringing together fashion and technology to create a unique and scalable business proposition that will benefit from CFE’s expert advice, guidance and timely interventions over a period of six months. CFE is London’s pioneering fashion and fashion tech business incubator, whose purpose is to fast-track designers and entrepreneurs into successful businesses. CFE works with designers and creative entrepreneurs to transform talent and ideas into businesses by providing support programmes that facilitate their USP, vision and innovation. By implementing business strategy for creative entrepreneurs, CFE aims to empower growth for individuals and businesses. “We are beyond excited to be able to join the Fashtech Pioneer Programme. We are confident that the support, mentorship and network from the CFE will deeply challenge us and push Petit Pli to reach its full potential. We look forward to connecting with, and learning from the knowledge and experience of both mentors and fellow participants.” – PETIT PLI “We are so proud and excited to be part of the CFE FashTech Programme. We are on an exciting journey to change how people feel about their morning routine, and it is invaluable for a start-up like us to be able to...
FASHION FIX: THE SMART INNOVATIONS YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT

FASHION FIX: THE SMART INNOVATIONS YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT

The global smart fabrics market is projected to reach $5.5bn by 2022, according to a recent report by Transparency Market Research, with the sector set to undergo a segmentation based on products, applications and functions. In terms of application, fashion is one of the key industries where smart fabrics could be incorporated and help lead the growth of the market. While players in the industry might feel like the conversation around getting the convergence of fashion and technology right has been going on for ages (and it really has!) without much change, we have actually come a long way since the dawn of fashion tech circa 2004. The smart creatives have realised that fashion tech pieces are not merely a light up dress (although there’s nothing wrong with a bit of sparkle). Similarly, engineers have understood the importance of how products look and feel, making design a fundamental part of the product creation process instead of an after thought. Lastly, and arguably the most exciting part, is that some fashion tech pieces have made their way to the consumer market, as opposed to staying confined to the real of performance art, reserved for celebrities and the runway only. With that in mind, we decided to round up some the most stylish and functional products on the market. Emel + Aris Smart Coat London-based brand Emel+Aris has created the world’s first luxury smart coat by using revolutionary heat technology. The coat, which is available for both men and women, lets the wearer control the temperature with three heat settings, which can be activated at the touch of a button. The...
MEET YIYU CHEN, THE TAIWANESE DESIGNER MAKING WAVES IN THE INDUSTRY

MEET YIYU CHEN, THE TAIWANESE DESIGNER MAKING WAVES IN THE INDUSTRY

You’d be forgiven if you haven’t heard of Yiyu Chen.. yet. But not for long. The Taichung-based designer, who’s just won Denmark’s first fashion technology competition, Aarhus Walks on Water, says she’s has always been interested in clothing but this was her first time integrating technology into her work. “Fashion for me is appealing in both substance and significance level. I really enjoy the process of making each piece of garments, taking care of details and trying to present them in a proper way. On the other hand, the fact that fashion is always evolving with society and reflecting civilized life, make it a difficult task for a designer to be always relevant. There’s always something to learn.”   While this might have been the first time Chen has solely worked with tech, her work experience includes working alongside the legendary Iris Van Herpen – undoubtedly one of the trailblazers in the industry. “To work in Iris Van Herpen’s atelier was very challenging but with a lot of fun. Sometimes we need to experiment with different materials and try to figure out how to achieve the ideal results. Iris is really calm and friendly; I truly respect that she always knows what she wants and has a clear standard of quality. The experience taught me a lot on how a designer should insist and persist during design and producing process, the amazing results on Iris’s show coming with no accident. This experience makes me more open to any challenge and willing to cooperate with people in different fields.” As part of the AWOW competition, designers were tasked with creating...