EVENT REPORT | THE DNA OF DISRUPTIVE BRANDS

EVENT REPORT | THE DNA OF DISRUPTIVE BRANDS

The breakfast session, hosted by brand experience agency Rufus Leonard, featured a panel of disruptive brands including The House of St Barnabas, Birchbox, and Kaido. It opened with a presentation from Charlotte Beckett, senior strategist at Rufus Leonard, on “The DNA of Disruption”, the four main components being “The Individual”, “The Team”, “The Organisation”, and “The Consumer”. First, though, some context. As a trusted adviser to some of the UK’s most established brands, Rufus Leonard is fascinated in disruption and understanding the ways in which learning from the disruptors can help these brands avoid being disrupted while disrupting categories themselves. A year ago, the agency set out in its attempt to measure brand experience with the first Brand Experience Index, which enables brands to calculate their total impact on customers across touchpoints compared to their competitors. Rufus Leonard is launching the second wave in the coming weeks, which will combine the agency’s interest in disruptors with that of brand experience. Rufus Leonard started with a hypothesis in mind – that the disruptors in each sector would score well on practical, active measures such as “Do” and “Purpose” but were surprised that, in fact, brands including Airbnb, Netflix, and Uber, posted higher Brand Experience Index scores in the three more emotional facets: “Feel”, “Sense”, and “Connect”. This highlights that for a brand or a business to truly disrupt a market it can’t just engage with people in rational terms, it has to engage on an emotional level as well – winning people’s hearts and minds. The DNA of a Disruptive Organisation  Charlotte Beckett, senior strategist, Rufus Leonard In terms of providing a definition,...
FASHION FIX: THE SMART INNOVATIONS YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT

FASHION FIX: THE SMART INNOVATIONS YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT

The global smart fabrics market is projected to reach $5.5bn by 2022, according to a recent report by Transparency Market Research, with the sector set to undergo a segmentation based on products, applications and functions. In terms of application, fashion is one of the key industries where smart fabrics could be incorporated and help lead the growth of the market. While players in the industry might feel like the conversation around getting the convergence of fashion and technology right has been going on for ages (and it really has!) without much change, we have actually come a long way since the dawn of fashion tech circa 2004. The smart creatives have realised that fashion tech pieces are not merely a light up dress (although there’s nothing wrong with a bit of sparkle). Similarly, engineers have understood the importance of how products look and feel, making design a fundamental part of the product creation process instead of an after thought. Lastly, and arguably the most exciting part, is that some fashion tech pieces have made their way to the consumer market, as opposed to staying confined to the real of performance art, reserved for celebrities and the runway only. With that in mind, we decided to round up some the most stylish and functional products on the market. Emel + Aris Smart Coat London-based brand Emel+Aris has created the world’s first luxury smart coat by using revolutionary heat technology. The coat, which is available for both men and women, lets the wearer control the temperature with three heat settings, which can be activated at the touch of a button. The...
FASHION TECH EVENTS AND OPPORTUNITIES YOU DON’T WANT TO MISS

FASHION TECH EVENTS AND OPPORTUNITIES YOU DON’T WANT TO MISS

Another fashion month is behind us and while we didn’t see as much tech updates on the runway, the fashion tech crowd was as active as ever. We walked on water at Denmark’s first floating show, talked about smart retail at Avantex Paris and discussed how fashion can use technology to tap into the Transformation Economy at Digital Fashion Forum. And as we’re entering a full fall season, there’s much more to get excited about. Here are our top event picks in the coming months. What: Fashion Tech Week Where: Paris, France When: 12th – 20th October 2017 The rundown: The fifth edition of Fashion Tech Week will bring together industry experts and enthusiasts for a mix of events across the French capital, with an opening night that will include speakers from Lectra, Easysize and Amazon. Other highlights include a fashion tech pitch night, where 5 startups will present their ideas in from of an expert jury, Fashion tech expo, which will welcome 18 exhibitors presenting products and services across the categories Morphing fashion, High-tech fashion and Eco-citizen fashion and a hackathon. So, whether you’re an entrepreneur, designer or just curious about the industry, we’re sure you’ll find something that suits! Find out more here. What: Superhuman Summit Where: Vancouver, Canada When: 21st October 2017 The rundown: Superhuman Summit is a single day speaker-focused event presenting ideas on how to advance your human potential. A collection of expert speakers, musical performances, and lunchtime breakouts led by unique specialists will lead you to become more superhuman. This single-day showcase presents lessons, stories and practices from superhuman specialists that are rooted...
AWOW PUTS DENMARK ON THE FASHIONTECH MAP

AWOW PUTS DENMARK ON THE FASHIONTECH MAP

Danish design is known all around the world and the country has been a leader in the field for decades. In a natural step for Denmark’s progressive design thinking, we will soon see the city of Aarhus carving its spot in the fashiontech scene through Aarhus Walks on Water – a weekend of activities covering the intersection of fashion and technology, all of which are free to attend and open to the public. The event is a collaboration between Aarhus University, VIA University College, Headstart Fashion and the festival at Filmby Aarhus / Interactive Denmark, with the concept developed by professor Marianne Ping Huang, Lene Elsner and fashion designer Gitte Søgaard. This spring Aarhus Walks on Water staged an open call for designers to take part in the first fashion technology competition in Denmark. After careful consideration, eight international design teams were chosen, paired with regional fashion companies and tasked with the challenge to recreate four of the companies’ own styles with a fashiontech twist. The final pieces will be showcased at a spectacular floating runway on the city’s harbour. Aarhus Walks on Water is the first of its kind when it comes to collaboration between the fashion, business and educational partners. The big night will see the winning team leaving with a prize of €10,000 awarded by a team of international jury members including our own Kristina Dimitrova, Radr founder Preben Meyer and Elektro Couture fashion tech designer in residence Joanna Hir. By the looks of the initial designer sketches (see some of them below), it’s going to be one hell of a show!   Beyond the AWOW...
EVENT RECAP | FESTIVAL OF CURIOSITY

EVENT RECAP | FESTIVAL OF CURIOSITY

Two months after we had first met the designers shortlisted for Festival of Curiosity’s studio residency, it was time to shine. The Chocolate Factory had been transformed from their usual work space to a full blown runway and guests were taking their seats in excitement, probably just as much as the designers and models backstage. Through their residency, the creatives – Ally Nolan, Maureen Sellina Laverty, Rebecca Marsden, Danielle Jordan, Dearbhla O’Beirne and Roisin Pierce – explored how new technologies can be integrated into fashion design. Each of the designers presented their unique vision of fashion and technology, which is why the jury (including our own Kristina Dimitrova), had an incredible difficult task of choosing a single winner. After much debate and discussion, the Future Fashion Design prize was awarded to TCD Master student Ally Nolan for her piece The Queen of the Night. See below the magnificent pieces from all six designers and the inspiration behind them. Ally Nolan – The Queen of the Night (Overall Winner; Most Creative Use of Technology) Design inspired by 18th-century crinolines and 1950s Dior; The 800 petals are laser cut at different depths, making the neoprene fabric semi transparent. When they are back lit with LED lights the detail on each petal is illuminated. Topped with a sheer mesh black bodice and a beret composed of battery powered petals. Maureen Laverty – Where’s my Arm Hole / My Head’s Stuck (Best Design Process) Organic jersey garments that interact with each other through sensors made using conductive fabric and stitching. The integrated pressure and stretch sensors between the top garments change the intensity and...
FESTIVAL OF CURIOSITY BRINGS FASHIONTECH TO DUBLIN

FESTIVAL OF CURIOSITY BRINGS FASHIONTECH TO DUBLIN

If you follow us on Instagram you might have seen that back in May we met with a group of aspiring designers in Dublin for a day of talks, knowledge-exchange and overall good vibes. For these six girl bosses, the hangout actually marked the start of Festival of Curiosity’s Future Fashion competition. Since then, the designers have been working tirelessly on their vision of the future of fashion, which will culminate in a fusion of fashion and technology showcase later this month. Now in its fifth year, Festival of Curiosity is Dublin’s celebration of science, tech, art and design where the focus is cross-collaboration, learning and having fun along the way. This year saw the launch of the Curiosity Studio – a design and research residency programme – which for this year’s edition focuses on the exploration of fashion and technology. Six outstanding designers were chosen after a casting call to work in the studio on the theme of Illuminations, from Darkness to Light. During their residency the creatives received mentorship and guidance from a number of organisations and individuals including Make Fashion Canada, INTERLACED, The British Council in Ireland and CONNECT. It didn’t take long after meeting Ally Nolan, Maureen-Seline Laverty, Rebecca Marsden, Danielle Jordan, Dearbhla O’Beirne and Rosin Pierce to see that they weren’t just interested in creating just another illuminated dress. The way they want to approach fashion and technology looks at how it can improve people’s lives, contribute positively to the environment and empower women. Laverty, for example, started her career at Alexander McQueen and Savile Row but wanted to use her apparel construction techniques...