ASICS ENTERS THE FITNESS-AS-A-SERVICE SPACE WITH THE LAUNCH OF ASICS STUDIO

ASICS ENTERS THE FITNESS-AS-A-SERVICE SPACE WITH THE LAUNCH OF ASICS STUDIO

Health and fitness apps usage has grown by more than 330% over the last three years, according to a 2017 research by Flurry Analytics, which found that 96% of people stay loyal to their apps and more than 75% of active users open their digital helper at least two times a week. The study also reports that highest growth in the category is coming from studio and fitness content apps. Which explains not only the rise in the number of health and wellness startups, but also the investment in training apps from sportswear giants such as Nike, Adidas and Under Armour. Asics is the latest player entering the space. The brand has launched a new subscription-based fitness app, featuring a variety of workouts (outdoor running, indoor cycling, elliptical, strength training and treadmill fusion) created by professional personal trainers. Asics Studio, which is focused on audio-led coaching and motivation, offers three types of subscription packages: monthly ($9.99), quarterly ($23.99) and yearly ($95.99) and include unlimited workouts.   Asics Studio will become the latest addition to OneAsics – the company’s membership program for the entire Asics family (ASICS, ASICS Tiger, Onitsuka Tiger and Haglofs), where users can access special gear, services, events and expertise such as free shipping, access to Runkeeper Go subscriptions and free 90-day shoe returns even after you run in them. “Asics has been the leading brand in the running category. Part of the acquisition of Runkeeper in 2016 was to cement that position further. It is now leveraging that strength and expertise to expand into a wider fitness arena beyond running. It is also part of Asics’ effort for expanding...
THE CHANGING INFLUENCER LANDSCAPE AND THE CUSTOMER AS A CO-CREATOR

THE CHANGING INFLUENCER LANDSCAPE AND THE CUSTOMER AS A CO-CREATOR

Gone are the days when managing social media was on the duty list of the intern. As the social space becomes ever more complex with the rise of new platforms and algorithmic timelines, brands need to work hard to keep up not only with the developments in these channels but also getting to know the personalities that rule them. From celebrities to micro-influencers It’s not news that companies should set aside budgets for influencer marketing, however, what that budget is has changed dramatically. If a few years ago turning to bloggers was a more cost-effective way to reach consumers rather than, let’s say, a TV ad, we’ve almost reached the point where companies have to choose one or the other. To put it in context, the most followed YouTube starts (with 7m subscribers and more) can command $300k for a video partnership, while an agency-produced 30-second TV ad could cost $350k. Let that sink in. This doesn’t mean that influencer marketing is going away but in 2017, the social space gave rise to another group of socially-savvy users who are more authentic, more accessible and, in a lot of cases, more influential: the micro-influencers. Unlike celeb-status bloggers and vloggers (think Chiara Ferragni or Zoella), micro-influencers are rising social stars who, while not having millions of followers (yet), create greater engagement. Most of the time, they also operate in a specific niche (eco travel, tattoo artistry or a very particular type of illustration) which leads to that increased follower engagement and makes them a trusted source of information. Social agency HelloSociety found that micro-influencers (those with 30k followers or less)...
CHRISTOPHER RAEBURN’S SENDS A STRONG SUTAINABLE MESSAGE WITH HIS LATEST COLLECTION

CHRISTOPHER RAEBURN’S SENDS A STRONG SUTAINABLE MESSAGE WITH HIS LATEST COLLECTION

Repeat after us: Remade, Reused, Recycled. These are the core values of Christopher Raeburn’s eponymous brand. Since its beginnings in 2001, the incredibly collaborative fashion studio has been pushing forward its vision of sustainable and intelligent design by the reworking of surplus fabrics and garments to create distinctive and functional pieces. In 2018, the importance of this vision for purposeful design processes and products is even greater. Even though sustainability starts being on top of the agenda for some, the reality is that we still live in world of over-consumption and fast fashion, where nor many brands, neither a lot of customers care about the impact of their purchases. And then, there’s Raeburn, whose studio goes as fas as hosting Repair Open Days, where customers can bring their garment and have it fixed for free. “Don’t chuck it or buy a new one, let us repair it,” urges the website page for the event. So, we can move the needle. And Raeburn is one of the handful of designers who are true eco warriors in the industry. His innovative approach to crafting wearable and versatile garments shone once again at London Fashion Week’s Men. For his latest AW18 collection, aptly named Immerse, the design studio draws inspiration from the beauty and fragility of our oceans, standing as our most creative call to arms to protect both the planet and the wearer. Raeburn’s Remade ethos is further emphasized this season through the use of pioneering materials, including protective neoprene immersion suits and Royal Air Force helicopter winchman coveralls, which have been cut and reworked into women’s anorak and men’s overcoat, yet...
DEUTSCHE TELEKOM AND LUFTHANSA UNVEIL THE FUTURE OF FLYING

DEUTSCHE TELEKOM AND LUFTHANSA UNVEIL THE FUTURE OF FLYING

For some, the CES starts as soon as they step into the Las Vegas Convention Centre. For others – while flying at 33,000 feet on the way to the conference. That’s exactly what Deutsche Telekom and Lufthansa did yesterday (08.01.2018) through their FlyingLab event on its Lufthansa Airbus A380 from Frankfurt to Houston. FlyingLab is this year’s challenge set out by Deutsche Telekom’s Fashion Fusion initiative, in partnership with Lufthansa. In 2017, the competition brief invited fashion, creative and engineering talent to submit their ideas about enhancing long-distance flight experience through the use of fashion and technology. This wasn’t just about innovation around the passengers’ experience but included the cabin crew too. Over the past few month, the finalists of the three finalist teams worked at Fab Lab Berlin on intelligent solutions for the flight experience of tomorrow. Three prototypes were presented and tested on board, including projects for new airline seats, on-board entertainment, and methods of communication between cabin crew and passengers. Team feel.flight focused on increasing passengers’ well-being on long-haul flights, presenting a chatbot system for communication between passengers and flight attendants. The chatbot can classify passenger needs, arrange them by priority and coordinate the appropriate service activities. For other matters, such as requests for food and drinks or tips against fear of flying, the request is transferred to a real flight attendant. The team also developed a smart blanket with integrated neck pillow which can be worn like a cape and adjusted to the passenger’s individual need for warmth. Vibrations in the blanket’s neck pillow can wake the passenger gently, without a flight attendant having to...
WHY TRANSPARENCY AND SUSTAINABILITY WILL BE HOT THIS YEAR AND WHICH IS THE TECH SPEARHEADING THESE MOVEMENTS?

WHY TRANSPARENCY AND SUSTAINABILITY WILL BE HOT THIS YEAR AND WHICH IS THE TECH SPEARHEADING THESE MOVEMENTS?

Happy New Year, industry trailblazers! To help you kickstart what feels like the longest month of the year, we’re doing a series of articles highlighting key brands, technologies and changing consumer behaviours to watch in 2018. Enjoy Part One. Transparency Being honest and transparent in business is not exactly new. The poster children of this movement in the fashion industry are undoubtedly US-based Everlane, and the Swedish brand Honest By, founded in 2010 and 2012, respectively. Both companies aim to expose exactly what goes on into the production of the clothes thy sell – from design processes, to the fabrics they’re made in, the cost of fabrics, labour, and even the mark-up they put on the final product. Such 100% transparency policy may sound scary to many fashion brands, but we will see it manifested even more in 2018. As consumers become more informed than ever before, brands (fashion and beyond), will come to realise transparency around processes, pricing and provenance will move from a nice to need to have business practice for their businesses to be successful. Technology company Label Insight recently reported on the correlation between transparent business operations and ROI, stating that 39% of the people it surveyed said they would switch to a new brand if it offered complete transparency, 56% said they’d be loyal for life if a brand is transparent and 73% said they’d be willing to pay more for a product that offers complete transparency. The push for transparency means brands can no longer hide their unethical practices behind closed doors while portraying a good image to the outside world. If they do, consumers...
FLORA MIRANDA USES AI, DATA AND GENERATIVE DESIGN TO TURN YOUR FACEBOOK HISTORY INTO PERSONALISED GARMENTS

FLORA MIRANDA USES AI, DATA AND GENERATIVE DESIGN TO TURN YOUR FACEBOOK HISTORY INTO PERSONALISED GARMENTS

Antwerp-based fashion designer Flora Miranda focuses her work on the human being, one’s body, senses and perception, performing in an actual or virtual reality. She embraces the experiment as a vehicle towards broadening established standards of craftsmanship and design, challenging the obsolete idea of high couture. We came across Miranda’s innovative work during the third edition of Fashion Talks, which brings disruptors, emerging designers and established fashion and creative businesses to celebrate the industry and ponder the future. Miranda was exhibiting her latest project – IT Pieces – a tool that collects data about a user’s online behaviour to design a unique item of clothing, especially with him or her in mind. People sign in with the app, which gathers information about their online behaviour, including Google searches, Facebook friends, places visited or music downloaded. It then personalises a t-shirt with a number of lyrics by Finnish musician Jaakko Eino Kalevi, which reflect the analysed information about the user. We sat down with the designer to talk more about IT Pieces, her creative process and breaking fashion conventions. What is your background? How did you get into fashion and what sparked your interest in technology? My identity is anchored in a world of art, my father and other members of my family in Austria are musicians and visual artists. To me, art was the most natural environment to move in, the language I grew up with. The other side of my family is from a more pragmatic origin, owning and running a big farm is their way of living. I believe this is where my attraction to the business...