SEE THE FASHION TECH DESIGNERS TAKING PART IN BDYHAXCON’S PUT TOGETHER FASHION SHOW

SEE THE FASHION TECH DESIGNERS TAKING PART IN BDYHAXCON’S PUT TOGETHER FASHION SHOW

Back in August we announced the news that we’re partnering with BDYHAXCON to produce a fashion tech catwalk show for their upcoming conference in Austin. We know we’ve kept you in the dark for a while, so here’s some exciting news surrounding the show. The BDYHAX Fashion Show will kick off a weekend of bodyhacking, future tech, bionics, and transhumanism in Austin, TX on January 27th. Put Together will open with a “Waiting for Earthquakes” performance by Moon Ribas, a cyborg who senses earthquakes worldwide with the assistance of an implant in her arm. Waiting for Earthquakes translates these earthquakes happening anywhere on the planet into dance. If there are no earthquakes, there is no dance. Designers and technologists taking part in Put Together include Birce Ozkan, Teresa Lamb, Jingwen Zhu, Lina Wassong, Rachel Nhan, Sensoree and Vinaya, making for a unique combination of runway and display, as many of the pieces are too detailed for a traditional fashion show viewing. Pieces showcased will feature tech including responsive-design, sensory augmentation, new reactive materials, emotion tracking and 3d printed garments. Several designers will be on site after the runway portion to discuss the technology behind the pieces and to show off any small details. Music throughout the show will be performed live by Kiara Craft, who released “A Rumor About Love.” Kiara’s sultry voice, and soulful melodies are reminiscent of classic rhythm and blues, with a modern Pop vibe on top of Hip Hop-laced trap beats. Kiara’s wide array of musical influences (from Diana Ross to Aaliyah) make for a sound that is fresh, edgy, and distinctively “Kiara”. We’re also...
BRILLIANT FINDS, OR YOUR GUIDE TO PURCHASING JEWELRY ONLINE

BRILLIANT FINDS, OR YOUR GUIDE TO PURCHASING JEWELRY ONLINE

As the song goes.. Diamonds are a girl’s best friend. And as ecommerce is not showing signs of slowing down, buying a beautiful gift for somebody special is not limited to high street jewelry retailers. Online brands are now a valid option too. Just in case you’re thinking of such a purchase in time for the holiday season, we created a guide with a few important things to consider. Do Your Research With so much choice available online from retailers such as Ascot Diamonds, it’s important for customers to make sure that they have done some research and have a good idea of the type and style of jewelry that they are looking. Being as specific as possible when it comes to your idea of the perfect piece will make it easier for brand consultants to find the right match for you. Once you’ve found the perfect gift, it’s then crucial to do some research on the retailer – asking questions such as how long they have been trading, whether or not they meet ethical guidelines, and what kind of reviews they have will help you making the right decision. If something doesn’t feel right, it’s probably best to try somewhere else. Stick to Brands You Know It can be tempting to choose a piece of diamond jewelry from a retailer you’ve never heard of before simply because the price seems too good to be true. When shopping for anything online, but especially when shopping for valuable goods, you should always be vigilant about the retailers you shop with. Keep in mind that if a price seems too good to...
HOW THE INTERNET OF CLOTHES CHALLENGES OUR RELATIONSHIP WITH FASHION AND CONSUMPTION

HOW THE INTERNET OF CLOTHES CHALLENGES OUR RELATIONSHIP WITH FASHION AND CONSUMPTION

Be honest – how many of all clothes you own do you were regularly? There’s a fair chance you have at least one item of clothing in your wardrobe that you haven’t even worn once. As a society, we own four times as many clothes as we did 20 years ago, but regularly only wear about 20% of them. A new project from academics from Birmingham City University is hoping to change that. Senior Future Media lecturer Mark Brill and his team are working on a concept of a connected wardrobe that addresses the problem of unworn clothes by reminding you to wear them or to give them away to charity. The Internet of Clothes sees garments tagged using washable contactless technology, known as radio-frequency identification (RFID). The idea is that the clothes will monitor the frequency of wear and if they are not used for a certain time period, will notify their user to either wear them or think about giving them away to charity. Talking about the project, Brill explained that the connected wardrobe is“a practical, engaging concept encouraging people to think about their clothing consumption.”He hopes that it will result in more ethical fashion consumption.“Perhaps we can even move away from the idea of ‘ownership’ of clothing, to simply using them as long as we need them. When we’ve worn them enough, the items will pass themselves on to their next keeper to wear,” says Brill. Overconsumption of clothing is a problem for both the environment and exploitation of those who produce them. Clothing production is highly damaging to the environment, from the petrochemicals used in...
HOW TOPSHOP INJECTS TECH TO LEAD THE WAY IN HIGHSTREET RETAIL

HOW TOPSHOP INJECTS TECH TO LEAD THE WAY IN HIGHSTREET RETAIL

London Fashion Week is just around the corner and, if NYFW was anything to go by, this season’s fashion extravaganza will bring much more change than new prints and colour palettes. Tech has been increasingly present in headlines each fashion month and as the capital of both (fashion and tech), we expect London Fashion Week to have a trick or two up its sleeve. One of most prominent players in this interdisciplinary field is highstreet retailer Topshop. Fancy bodycon dresses and bleached denim shirts aside, the clothing giant is investing in some serious tech innovation. In 2014, when both the public and the industry were trying to get their head around virtual reality, Topshop was transporting consumers from its stores to the front row with Oculus Rift. Last year, the retailer partnered with Barclaycard for a line of stylish accessories such as phone cases, stickers and bracelets, which incorporated Barclaycard’s contactless payment technology and let users shop seamlessly in more than 300,000 locations across the UK. Later this year, a second, more luxurious line of the Topshop x bPay collection was unveiled. During the summer, the clothing giant also launched its first Top Pitch competition, encouraging designers and technologists to join its bootcamp programme and receive intensive coaching on how to bring their product to market as well as the chance to pitch to Topshop. The retailer recently announced the winner of the competition, Loomia (formerly The Crated) – a company focused on e-textiles and developing enabling technologies. The two parties will now work together on designing a prototype for a heated garment. Top Pitch makes the future of smart...
EVENT REPORT | FASHIONTECH AND THE USER EXPERIENCE

EVENT REPORT | FASHIONTECH AND THE USER EXPERIENCE

Image credit: Brooke Roberts Wearables London and INTERLACED came together this month to host an event exploring the intersection of fashion and technology to enhance user experiences. On Wednesday evening, we gathered in the stunning Kingsway Hall Hotel for an inspiring discussion on the latest in the fashiontech space. The event kicked off with Dr. Camille Baker, media artist, curator and researcher, focused on soft circuits, DIY electronics for smart garments and haptic interfaces for performance and mobile media. Baker went back some 15 years and shared some of her initial projects, as well as her latest work, which looks into ways in which performers can benefit from wearables. ‘Dancers are the hyper users of this technology,’ said the UCA reader. She referred to her MIND Touch project, which looked into new understandings of the sensations of ‘liveness’ and ‘presence’ that may emerge in participatory networked performance, using mobile phones and wearables. Another direction in which we can look at wearables is by fusing technology and biology, said Baker. As examples of this, she pointed to Giulia Tomasello’s Bioconductive Skin and Future Flora projects as well as the work of Anna Dumitriu and Kasia Molga. Next up, award-winning digital knitwear designer Brooke Roberts spoke about the need for us to see technology as an enabler and not the whole purpose of fashiontech products. Roberts, who has over a decade of experience as a diagnostic radiographer within the NHS, uses inspiration from scan images of the brain and sinuses to create knitwear using the latest digital knitting technology and yarns. This truly shows how fashion and technology can exist in...
INTERVIEW | KATE UNSWORTH, CEO, VINAYA

INTERVIEW | KATE UNSWORTH, CEO, VINAYA

Kate Unsworth needs no introduction to the fashion tech community. Since 2013, she has been using technology to help people find digital balance. Back then, under the name Kovert Designs, Unsworth and her team unveiled a smart connected jewelry, Altruis, which is undoubtedly created with the fashion-conscious crowd in mind. Last November, Kovert Desings rebranded to VINAYA and split the company into a Lab and a Studio. The researchers in the Lab look at academic papers and scientific articles, boil down the main findings and present them to the Studio product team, who use them as a guide for VINAYA’s upcoming products. And it looks like this approach has proven successful. When the startup announced the launch of its second product– the first emotion tracker – it smashed its crowdfunding goal of $100k in 41 hours. We sat down with Kate to hear more about the inspiration behind Zenta and trends in fashion, tech and wellbeing. What triggered the creation of Zenta? Our first product, Altruis, was all about using technology to help you silence the noise and still stay connected to the most important things and people in your life. A year in, we started digging deeper and asking “Why are we doing this? Why do we care about helping people disconnect from their phones?” What it really came down was emotional wellbeing. So, for the past 18 months we’ve been diving deeper into that and what we’ve created is the first emotion tracker that comes to market. It’s really cutting edge technology and the reason it doesn’t exist yet is because the technology hasn’t been advanced enough...
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