MEET THE MA MATERIAL FUTURES GRADUATES RETHINKING HOW WE CAN LIVE BETTER TOMORROW

MEET THE MA MATERIAL FUTURES GRADUATES RETHINKING HOW WE CAN LIVE BETTER TOMORROW

Based at the prestigious Central St. Martin’s College of Arts & Design, the MA Material Futures is a two years masters course exploring the intersection of craft, science and technology and looking beyond existing boundaries to anticipate future needs, desires and challenges. Taking materiality as the starting point of the design process the course integrates high and low technological materials and processes, pursuing relevant applications across a variety of industries such as fashion, architecture, product and communication design. Certainly, in our view, the course puts together one of the most thought-provoking graduate exhibitions in London. This year, the Material Futures graduate show, named Provocating Futures (Work in Progress), was no exception. Considering current and future trends, students explored our evolving relationship with technology, biology and design for a better tomorrow. Bio Conductive Skin is a project by Giuilia Tomasello, a graduate from the MAMF course and an active participant in all things fashion tech. As technology is getting closer and closer to our skin, the project questioned how we can make it more human. Bio Conductive Skin “explores the possibilities of creating biomaterials and proposes alternative applications to our current electronic compotents. These components should feel part of nature and behave just like us,” thinks Tomasello. “By exploring the notion of a technological second skin, I aim to design biocompatible devices that mimic the symbiotic relationship we have with other microorganisms that we cannot live without.” Giuilia proposes new alternatives to our current technological interfaces, aiming to blur the boundaries between what is human and what is technology. From redefining human and technology to rethinking today’s concept of luxury....
INSIDE LOUIS VUITTON SERIES 3

INSIDE LOUIS VUITTON SERIES 3

Just in time for London Fashion Week SS16 the French luxury giant Louis Vuitton unveiled LV Series 3 – the third exhibition in a series of artistic displays designed to portray the creative inspirations behind Louis Vuitton’s collections. This is a first for the UK, as LV Series 1 was held in Shanghai and Tokyo, while LV Series 2 – in LA, Beijing, Seoul and Rome. LV Series 3 – Past, Present, Future, invites visitors to discover the inspirations for the Fall 2015 women show of Nicolas Ghesquière, who was appointed as the Creative Director for the house in 2014. The experiential installation took us through a 13-room journey over three floors, exploring every step in the creative process that has gone towards creating this season’s collection – from initial product sketches, through to the experiences of the models on the day of the show. Designed and created in house, Series 3 is set to attract around 100,000 people who will be immersed in the Louis Vitton’s world of craftsmanship and timeless designs. Undoubtedly a clever marketing tactic that is likely to create commercial desire around the brand and see visitors also flocking to its stores. Digital is a fundamental part of the experience too, with each guide encouraging visitors to take as much pictures as they want and post them on social with the hashtag #LVSeries3. At the time of writing this article there are 15, 367 tagged pictures from the exhibition on Instagram alone. And we can’t judge – the experience is seriously impressive and we highly recommend it for any fashion lover. Some of our highlights...
INTERVIEW | CAMILLE BAKER

INTERVIEW | CAMILLE BAKER

The media artist and university lecturer talks about the ethical issues behind emerging technologies and the role of education Bitch, Stitch Make/Perform is the unique name of London’s most intellectual fashion-tech community. The group is a gathering for artistic, research and practice sharing, and aims to bring together people from different industries to discuss soft-circuits, e-textiles, digital fashion and DIY electronics. Camille Baker, its co-founder, is a seasoned arts-and-tech researcher and pioneer, who lectures at the University for the Creative Arts in Digital Media, collaborates in various tech and performance projects, and is working on two books on technology and art that are due in 2016. Primarily interested, but not exclusively, in wearable tech as an  expressive method for performance art, Camille concentrates in the way technology can be embodied and sensed. “For me it’s not so much about ‘fashion’ as it is about [tech-infused] garments that can be used for performative projects, she says”. Art and tech might have been her initial focus of interest but now Camille concentrates on much more than that. And after ten years of exploring new technologies in art and performance, Camille has also begun a journey to drive the industry with her community via meetups, discussions and workshops for designers, engineers and everybody in between. But the group doesn’t just share opinions and projects – it also shares knowledge. Their latest event, for example, was a workshop on photo and thermo dyes on fabric. This way, Camille and Melissa Coleman’s Stitch, Bitch project will take a role that should probably belong to the universities. “I am in a university that has three or four strong fashion courses...