MEET THE MA MATERIAL FUTURES GRADUATES RETHINKING HOW WE CAN LIVE BETTER TOMORROW

MEET THE MA MATERIAL FUTURES GRADUATES RETHINKING HOW WE CAN LIVE BETTER TOMORROW

Based at the prestigious Central St. Martin’s College of Arts & Design, the MA Material Futures is a two years masters course exploring the intersection of craft, science and technology and looking beyond existing boundaries to anticipate future needs, desires and challenges. Taking materiality as the starting point of the design process the course integrates high and low technological materials and processes, pursuing relevant applications across a variety of industries such as fashion, architecture, product and communication design. Certainly, in our view, the course puts together one of the most thought-provoking graduate exhibitions in London. This year, the Material Futures graduate show, named Provocating Futures (Work in Progress), was no exception. Considering current and future trends, students explored our evolving relationship with technology, biology and design for a better tomorrow. Bio Conductive Skin is a project by Giuilia Tomasello, a graduate from the MAMF course and an active participant in all things fashion tech. As technology is getting closer and closer to our skin, the project questioned how we can make it more human. Bio Conductive Skin “explores the possibilities of creating biomaterials and proposes alternative applications to our current electronic compotents. These components should feel part of nature and behave just like us,” thinks Tomasello. “By exploring the notion of a technological second skin, I aim to design biocompatible devices that mimic the symbiotic relationship we have with other microorganisms that we cannot live without.” Giuilia proposes new alternatives to our current technological interfaces, aiming to blur the boundaries between what is human and what is technology. From redefining human and technology to rethinking today’s concept of luxury....
THE FUTURE OF HEALTHCARE

THE FUTURE OF HEALTHCARE

Health care has always been a major stake in our global History. In 2015, challenges have never been so many. All around the world the health care industry needs to take drastic change measures. Even though technology may not (yet) have the solution for major issues like the recent Ebola epidemic, it brings up some reassuring hopes for the future. From wearables to smart textiles, nanotechnology and data collection, technology and science merge for enhanced healthcare perspectives. Here is a selection of the major upcoming trends that should help to reinvent how we take care of one another. DRIVING BEHAVIOURS Thanks to technology, we can use innovative tools and benefit from incentive systems to promote a more proactive model of health. We can better track, watch and analyse our behaviours. By learning to better understand our bodies, we are encouraged to make healthier lifestyle choices. Advanced sensors and algorithms provide deeper insights and personalized coaching. A healthier population, less reliant on the resources provided by the broader healthcare system, results from health care technologies paired with incentive game mechanics offered by insurance companies, employers and providers. EMPOWERING PATIENTS Through DIY diagnosis and data collection, consumers are encouraged to take a more central role in determining when they interact with the health care system. More importantly how their care is delivered. Patients are empowered with technologies and take part in social communities, enabling them to gather valuable advice or self-diagnose before they do visit a medical professional. These innovations better prepare patients to collaborate with their doctors, and can be further supported by guidance around individual treatment plans to ensure optimal outcomes. WEARABLE DIGITAL HEALTH New tech, social platforms...