NEW YORK FASHION WEEK A/W16 RECAP

NEW YORK FASHION WEEK A/W16 RECAP

A beautiful mess. That’s exactly what springs to mind when trying to describe the start of Autumn/Winter16 fashion month. From labels redefining the fashion calendar as we know it, to brands slowly becoming more open towards tech, the industry has never been more ripe for disruption. SEE NOW, BUY NOW STRATEGY The first breaking news around New York Fashion Week actually came from British giant Burberry. The company announced that, in a move to make its shows more relevant to global and always-on consumers, will be moving to a See now, buy now strategy. From September 2016, Burberry will consolidate its four calendar into two seasonless shows, featuring both menswear and womenswear collections. Instead of Spring/Summer and Autmun/Winter, the shows will be named the February and September based on the month they’re presented. What’s more, the collections will be available to purchase in-store and online immediately after each show and all marketing materials and advertising campaigns will reflect the strategy accordingly. The move comes in a bid to significantly shorten the traditional gap between runway shows and retail availability. This makes sense in the age of constant social media feeds, instant Snapchat stories from the runways and live-streamed catwalk shows. Back in December 2015, CFDA president Dianne von Furstenberg announced that she and her fellow board members have appointed consultancy company Boston Consultung Group to evaluate the effects on the industry if the fashion shows are turned into consumer-facing events. A major drive for this is all the social media hype, she told WWD. After the announcement from Burberry, designers like Tommy Hilfiger, Rebecca Minkoff and Thakoon made similar...
FASHION & TECHNOLOGY AT NYFW

FASHION & TECHNOLOGY AT NYFW

As NYFW is coming to an end for another season we look at some of the technologically-enhanced designs and accessories that paraded the catwalks. Coding on top of the agenda With our lives becoming more and more connected, no wonder the importance of coding is significantly rising. And fashion seems keen to put in on top of the agenda too in order to get young girls and teens interested. Couple of months ago, supermodel – cookie maker and (recently) vlogger – Karlie Kloss launched the Kode with Karlie scholarship with the Flatiron School. The scholarship gave 21 young women the resources to become leaders in technology. As Karlie puts it ‘Code is the language of the future and it’s crucial that young women have a voice and a stake of what the future looks like”. This September, all sorts of fashion and technology giants have made this a priority. Google, fashion heavyweight Zac Posen and wearable technology designer & coder Maddy Maxey from The Crated combined forces for Google’s ‘Made with Code’ project. The collaboration saw the birth of an LED dress, coded by Maxey and debuted as part of the ZAC – Zac Posen Spring 2016 collection at New York Fashion Week. The collaboration aims to encourage young women to get into coding and show that it can go way beyond the screen. Naturally, the LED dress was modelled by high-fashion model, tech-lover and Posen’s close friend Coco Rocha. New beauty & fashion standards Chromat‘s designer Becca McCharen is somewhat an expert in breaking fashion laws and setting new standards for beauty and designs. This is the reason...