EVENT REPORT | DIGITAL FASHION FORUM

EVENT REPORT | DIGITAL FASHION FORUM

To say September kept us busy will be an understatement. Straight after tons of catwalk shows, presentations and exhibitions at London Fashion Week, we headed to sunny Athens to take part in the first Digital Fashion Forum, organized by Fashion Daily. The conference is the only event for fashion and retail professionals in the Greek market that addresses the technological developments changing the industry and highlights the new opportunities presented by the rise of digital. Our founder, Kristina Dimitrova was one of three international speakers, alongside with Brian McBride (Chairman, ASOS) and Sue Seel (Lecturer, London College of Fashion). We had a fabulous day mingling with attendees, fellow speakers and exhibitors at DFF. For those who couldn’t join us in person, we’ve compiled some key takeaways from the day. ON CONSUMER ENGAGEMENT While in the US and UK (as well as most of Western Europe) the fashion blogging industry is quite saturated, in Greece the notion of blogging is just starting to get tracktion. A panel including Maritzina Kalognoma (Ogilvy Group), Galatea Laskaraki (Marie Claire), Zeta A.Tsakoumis (Journalist & Blooger), Tonia Fousek (Athens Xclusive Designers Week) among others, addressed the opportunities of working with influencers for publishers and brands. “Blogging doesn’t mean that magazines will become irrelevant,” agreed the panel. “Blogs represent just another channel of communication and engagement.” Brand consultant and academic Sue Seel touched upon on the power of bloggers and hinted how brands can have just as personal interaction with consumers. ‘Make customers your heroes,’ she said referring to the fact that 55% of people share their purchases on social media. ‘Use that to engage with...
INTERLACED & BDYHAXCON PARTNER FOR FASHIONTECH SHOW IN AUSTIN

INTERLACED & BDYHAXCON PARTNER FOR FASHIONTECH SHOW IN AUSTIN

We are thrilled to announce that INTERLACED has partnered with the team at BDYHAXCON for their upcoming conference, expo and fashion tech show in January 2017. As an official partner, INTERLACED will co-produce BDYHAXCON’s special Put Together Fashion Tech Show. Between 27-29 January 2017, Austin’s Convention Center will become the home for discovering new tech, knowledge and inspiration surrounding body- and biohacking, fashion tech, augmented and virtual reality, cognitive training and much more. BDYHAXCON is about anything you can do to your body to be more your ideal self. However a bodyhacker decides to physically alter or improve their mind or body, there’s always more to discover, learn, teach, synthesize, and celebrate.   If you’re a fashion tech designer, maker, engineer, who wants to showcase their creation to the world, get in touch   In addition to the inspiring talks, meetups and expo, in 2017, BDYHAXCON is adding a fashion spin to the experience. The Put Together fashion tech show, which INTERLACED will co-produce, will take place on 27th January 2017 and bring together the latest and greatest in fashion tech, raging from exoskeletons to more conventional cloth-based pieces that’s anything but conventional. As INTERLACED produced one of the first full fashion tech catwalk shows in Europe, we are excited to bring together once again the most exciting designers and technologies who make the magic happen. The best part? There are still spots to fill! So, if you’re a fashion tech designer, maker, engineer, who wants to showcase their creation to the world, get in touch! We can’t wait to hear from you! Our own Kristina Dimitrova will also...
EVENT REPORT | FASHIONTECH AND THE USER EXPERIENCE

EVENT REPORT | FASHIONTECH AND THE USER EXPERIENCE

Image credit: Brooke Roberts Wearables London and INTERLACED came together this month to host an event exploring the intersection of fashion and technology to enhance user experiences. On Wednesday evening, we gathered in the stunning Kingsway Hall Hotel for an inspiring discussion on the latest in the fashiontech space. The event kicked off with Dr. Camille Baker, media artist, curator and researcher, focused on soft circuits, DIY electronics for smart garments and haptic interfaces for performance and mobile media. Baker went back some 15 years and shared some of her initial projects, as well as her latest work, which looks into ways in which performers can benefit from wearables. ‘Dancers are the hyper users of this technology,’ said the UCA reader. She referred to her MIND Touch project, which looked into new understandings of the sensations of ‘liveness’ and ‘presence’ that may emerge in participatory networked performance, using mobile phones and wearables. Another direction in which we can look at wearables is by fusing technology and biology, said Baker. As examples of this, she pointed to Giulia Tomasello’s Bioconductive Skin and Future Flora projects as well as the work of Anna Dumitriu and Kasia Molga. Next up, award-winning digital knitwear designer Brooke Roberts spoke about the need for us to see technology as an enabler and not the whole purpose of fashiontech products. Roberts, who has over a decade of experience as a diagnostic radiographer within the NHS, uses inspiration from scan images of the brain and sinuses to create knitwear using the latest digital knitting technology and yarns. This truly shows how fashion and technology can exist in...
THE CRATED CREATES SLEEK ENTERPRISE WEARABLE

THE CRATED CREATES SLEEK ENTERPRISE WEARABLE

Before smartwatches and fitness trackers hit the consumer market, the investments in wearable technology came mainly from the military, enterprise and medical industries. Why? Well.. while fitness buffs use these devices to track and boast about their workouts, the use cases in business settings can be far more valuable. For example, emergency workers and medical personnel could use wearables to get vital data at a moment’s notice or alerts around safety and security. Because of their purpose, the focus on enterprise wearables can be much more function than design but we are happy to see that this is starting to change. At The Next Web conference in Amsterdam, INTERLACED friends THE CRATED unveiled a sleek and functional safety wearable prototype for the enterprise. The Armor vest, as it is called, responds to a worker’s heat, stress levels and posture, using printed circuitry on fabric. The piece is a new type of smart apparel designed to monitor harmful working conditions that one may face during the day, such as bodily stress, extreme temperatures and compromising postures. THE CRATED collaborated with another New York startup, Strong Arm Technologies, and smart clothes platform Bon Bouton to create the prototype. Using a printed graphene temperature sensor by Bon Bouton and taking inspiration from StrongArm’s deep understanding and connection to the safety of active workers (who they call Industrial Athletes), The Crated designed and fabricated Armor using their own textile circuitry technology, INTELLITEX. The Circuit was printed onto fabric using custom formulas and machinery built by THE CRATED. This device can be housed in any apparel exterior. In industry, the circuit would likely be...
ONE YEAR ON: THE PROGRESS OF GOOGLE JACQUARD AND LEVI’S

ONE YEAR ON: THE PROGRESS OF GOOGLE JACQUARD AND LEVI’S

Technology giant Google has come a long way in the realm of fashion tech. After learning the hard way that you can’t just collaborate with a designer once to give a tech invention trendy status, the company has devoted significant resources into getting right the blend of fashion and technology. A testament to that commitment was last year’s announcement of Project Jacquard in partnership with clothing company Levi’s. To recap, Project Jacquard makes it possible to weave touch and gesture interactivity into any textile using standard, industrial looms, thus enabling everyday objects such as clothes or furniture to be transformed into interactive surfaces. At its annual I/O conference last week, Google and Levi’s shared progress of the project and announced their first interactive item – the Levi’s Commuter x Jacquard by Google Trucker Jacket. “This is going to be absolutely game-changing for fashion design.” “I am so fascinated by this project, and I’m really excited to see what Google creates. Through the utilization of conductive threads, it will be possible to create textiles that can recognize computation interfaces, opening up countless opportunities for further development of fashion tech,” said fashion tech designer Alexis Walsh when we reached out for a comment on the project. “This is going to be absolutely game-changing for fashion design.”   HOW IT WORKS   The fabric includes conductive yarns, made of a combination of natural yarns and metallic alloys. The jacket includes a detachable smart tag, which makes it possible to function. While the tag needs to be removed to charge or when the wearer needs to wash the jacket, the actual fabric of...